Glass On Glass Mosaic Instructions

Stained glass applique
Stained glass applique

Have you ever tried Stained Glass Appliqué?

It’s a fantastically easy way of creating panels without lead or soldering. What’s more, you can use up all those scappy bits of leftover glass to create stunning panels.

So what is Stained Glass Applique? Basically it’s pieces of glass bonded to a base glass, with grouting filling the gaps in between.

This grouting becomes an important part of the design, as it reads solid black and renders the colours of the glass even more brightly.

sunflower glass mosaic
Glass sunflower mosaic

There’s as many different approaches as there are people; ranging from very precise figurative work with minimal grouting, or bold, free, abstract designs that exploit the shapes of the grouting to maximum effect.

The page was guest-written by an expert who lives in the US, and it takes you right through the whole process.

If you want to find the best glue, and how to avoid unsightly squeezing out of the grout underneath the glass, this is the page for you. Go on, have a go!

laying glass mosaic in place
Laying the glass in place

All work pictured by Light Romance Studios

20 thoughts on “Glass On Glass Mosaic Instructions”

  1. Question. I’m more familiar with stained glass and experimenting with glass on glass mosaic. Thanks for this great article. I’m unsure how to finish my piece! I’ve seen one example where someone glued and grouted in something already framed (think a picture frame). Does zinc came come in wider channel widths? I’ve only seen 5/32″ on delphi, and this is too narrow for the 2 layers of glass that comprise the mosaic. Any thoughts?

    Reply
    • It does come wider than that Rachel. You can get U profile zinc came at various widths all the way up to 3/4″. Oh, just realised you’re talking about the height! 5/32″ is your limit I’m afraid… try asking Lou Ann Weeks at IC Mosaics, she knows everything about mosaics, I’m really the stained glassser 🙂

      Reply
  2. Hi there…I have recently over the past few years stared to have more issues working with smaller long period of anything crafty. I used to sit for hours and enjoy foiling my glass but no longer can I do this.
    I have cut up glass designs for one of my kitchen door. I figure I can put one of those lil battery operated light in the cupboard so the light can show thru my glass piece.
    The only think is that I just dont have the ability to no foil all the glass pieces .
    So I thought of getting a clear piece of glass and lay my cut up pieces on the clear and glue them on the big clear glass. . Has anyone done this ? I was thinking of getting the silicone glue and adding BlacK acrylic paint tot he glue and use that to glue the pieces together so it can look as though its been foiled and solder and then he black patina . So if I use a specific good glue and add the Black acrylic paint to the glue and then glue the. Pieces the the plain glass panel…I can sandwich it with another clear on top and put it on the wood panel door . does anyone know what is a good glue to use to do this if you have done so?

    Reply
    • Hello MJ, that sure is a creative solution to your situation! I’m not an expert in Mosaics but Lou Ann Weeks is at IC Mosaics. She’s very friendly too, I’m sure she can help you with this. Here’s her website: https://i-c-mosaics.com/
      Good luck, I’m sure there’s a way!

      Reply
    • Thanks Lou Ann, very helpful. For anyone reading this, Lou Ann is my ‘go-to’ for mosaics as it’s not my area of expertise. She knows it all 🙂

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      • PLEASE, PLEASE, check this information further. I used gorilla clear glue after reading this because I trust you and this site. Both my pieces, one quite large, had cracks appear in the applied glass within two weeks. I’m able to give them away as my friends don’t care, but they are unsaleable.
        Apparently this is a problem with this glue and with E6000. The degree of hardness prevents normal glass expansion and it cracks. They are indoor pieces and not subjected to weather variations and I have done many similar with weldbond, but wanted to try a faster drying glue.

        Reply
        • Thank you for this Joan and I’m sorry you had a bad experience off the back of some advice from my site. I’ll email Lou Ann and tell her as I wouldn’t want anyone else going down the same route as you. Thanks again.
          Later: see below for Lou Ann’s reply.

          Reply
        • Joan, Lou Ann Weeks has got back to me with this comment, after hearing of your problem. She’d never had a problem but there are different factors in play, the size of the pieces, the thickness of the glue, the heat etc:
          “Probably the best recommendation is to consider using clear acrylic backers instead of glass for “glass on glass” mosaics. Yesterday another mosaic artist stated that the gorilla glue cracked her glass, but I don’t know all the circumstances – where it was located, size of glass pieces, etc…

          The issue may be in gluing glass on glass in general; however, I personally have not had any bad experiences with gorilla glue. It does appear that larger pieces may tend to crack glass easier than small ones. So a possible safe alternative is to use clear acrylics, if possible, as a clear backer for mosaics instead of glass.” I hope that helps, if belatedly.

          Reply
  3. Hola-I live in Mexico and am having a hard time getting Weldbond Glue as the shipping prices have become exorbitant ! What the next best glue for Glass to Glass application That dries perfectly clear like weldbond and doesn’t yellow! Elmers? Resitol?

    Reply
    • Hi, I do mosaics and used Weldbond on glass to glass application and found that Weldbond doesn’t dry completely clear. It’s great on other backer boards. I purchased a CLEAR glue called LEXEL by Sashco from Maryland Mosaics. It worked beautifully and dried clear. You only need a very small amount. It’s also great for outside projects as it’s waterproof. I hope this helps.

      Reply
  4. Thank you! And thank you in general for all of the information you provide! I am just starting the experiment with GOG and was very excited to see this!! I did read that in order to avoid having the grout bleed, you should do a Welbond wash after gluing the pieces down. You mix Welbond with water and literally paint it on in order to fill the cracks and crevices. Have you ever heard of that?

    Reply
    • I haven’t heard of that but it sounds like a practical idea. To be honest this isn’t my specialty – stained glass is – so I’m no expert here. The Glass on Glass tutorial here is guest written by Nasrene MacDonald.
      I hope you find it helpful.
      Thanks for your kind comments by the way, that’s nice 🙂

      Reply
  5. Dear Millie, I have experimented with different glues and found that the new clear glue used for phones that dry with led light works great. Perfectly clear and no residue. You might give it a try.

    Reply
      • I’d be truly interested in knowing the name also. I did some stained glass and grouted it but did it on plexiglass and it was a disaster a few years later. Maryann also mentioned mixing Weld bond with water and painting it owner the whole project before grouting so it would fill in the areas under the glass pieces so that the grout wouldn’t seep underneath the glass while it’s being grouted, have you heard of such a method and do you have any information on that process because it seems like it would with the grout bleeding. Sorry for so many questions ‼️

        Reply
        • Hello you could try searching on the web and ask someone who is more expert in glass mosaic than I am. Sorry, I’m tip top at stained glass and have only done a bit of mosaic and don’t want to pretend otherwise 🙂

          Reply

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